Showing posts with label poetry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label poetry. Show all posts

Thursday, May 11, 2017

The View Grill Now Open before Writers' Night Out

Diana Anhalt - Friday, May 12
7 p.m. 
followed by open mic



1st floor conference room
Union County Community Center, Blairsville, GA

And... here's a word from The View Grill's new management:

Join us Friday, May 12 to celebrate Mother's Day with The View's first ever Grand Buffet! This spectacular feast will include Prime Rib, Crab Legs, Peel-n-Eat Shrimp, Oysters on the Half Shell, Herb Baked Chicken, Broiled Fish, and various sides, salads, and desserts. All you can eat, including non-alcoholic beverages, for only $25.99! Buffet served from 5:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. Regular menu not available for this special event.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Poets Joan M. Howard and Rosemary R. Royston to read at the John C. Campbell Folk School Literary Hour, Brasstown, NC, Wed., May 17, 2017 at 7:00 PM



 On Wednesday, May, 17, 2017, 7:00 PM, two local poets will read at the John C. Campbell Folk School's, "The Literary Hour", at Brasstown, NC. Poets Joan M. Howard, and Rosemary Rhodes Royston will be reading selections of their poetry, and the public is invited.

Joan M. Howard’s poetry has been published in The Lyric, The Road Not Taken: The Journal of Formal Poetry, Lucid Rhythms, Victorian Violet, Our Pipe Dreams, Aurorean, Wild Goose Poetry Review, Miller's Pond, the 2012 Georgia Poetry Society's anthology Reach of Song, POEM, Wayfarer, and others.

Howard recently published a book of poetry, Death and Empathy: My Sister Web, a tribute to her sister Webster, and to Howard's husband, Jack. The book focuses on Howard’s grief and the gift of life itself, through nature, animals, travel and love. 

 She is a former teacher, member of North Carolina Writers' Network West, has studied German and English literature. Howard goes birding and spends time in Athens, GA, and on the beautiful waters of Lake Chatuge, in Hiawassee, Georgia.


Rosemary Rhodes Royston holds an MFA in Writing from Spalding University, is a lecturer at Young Harris College, Georgia, and is a Rep for North Georgia for the NCWN-West. Royston’s poetry has been published in journals such as The Southern Poetry Review, The Comstock Review, Main Street Rag, Coal Hill Review, FutureCycle, STILL, New Southerner, and Alehouse. Her essays on writing poetry are included in Women and Poetry: Tips on Writing, Teaching and Publishing by Successful Women Poets, McFarland. 

Royston’s poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and she was the recipient of the 2010 Literal Latte Food Verse Award. Her chapbook, Splitting the Soil, is available at Finishing Line Press. 

Most recently, she received Honorable Mention in the George Scarbrough Poetry Contest, Mountain Heritage Literary Festival, along with her short fiction being selected as Honorable Mention in the Porter Fleming Literary Awards, 2012. Royston blogs at The Luxury of Trees.

The Literary Hour at JCCFS is sponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network-West.

Monday, May 8, 2017

It was a great "Day for Writers", a NCWN-West event, at Sylva, NC, May 6, 2017


North Carolina Writers' Network-West's "Day for Writers", at the Jackson County Library, Sylva, NC, on May 6, 2017, proved to be a success. The conference was well attended, and many members and non-members of NCWN-West enjoyed the professional writing workshops.


Program Coordinator Glenda Beall
NCWN-West's Program Coordinator Glenda Council Beall, and professor/writer/and NCWN-West's representative for Jackson County, Catherine Carter kicked off the event. There were seven workshops offered at this conference. Presenters included, Katherine Stripling Byer, Terry Kay, Catherine Carter, Tara Lynne Groth, Deanna Klingel, and Gary Carden.





Katherine Stripling Byer
Katherine Stripling Byer's workshop was entitled, "Lifelines: letting another poet's work help revitalize ours". In this workshop, participants brought a copy of a poem by a poet whose work they admired and went to time and time again, and held clues for that person, Students then used these clues to modify a poem of theirs that needed to be energized, and re-evaluated in terms of its poetic elements.




Terry Kay
Terry Kay's workshops were: “The Things Dr. Epps Didn’t Teach Me”, which addressed basic writing techniques Kay described as the DNA of writing and, "Questions and Considerations, Issues that Writers might have that go beyond the typing of words".  Kay discussed the practical application of writing, such as the value of rhythm, the imperative power of verbs, the sense of voice, and some smoke and mirror tricks that work.




Catherine Carter
Catherine Carter's workshop was:  “ Free Verse Isn’t’: Sound and Structure in Free Forms”,  as in writing free verse, writers still have to make choices, as there are decisions to make regarding structure. Carter and her classroom participants explored some tightly crafted free verse poems, then wrote and shared some of their own, using devices that were discussed in this workshop.





Tara Lynne Groth
Tara Lynne Groth's topic was: "Why Authors need bylines in magazines and how to make that happen". This workshop focused on how an author's bylines in magazines and newspapers could help attract literary agents, grow their writer platform, aid in book marketing, craft a perfect query letter, build authority, and produce income. 





Deanna Klingel
Deanna Klingel's workshop was: "The Merry Go Round of Children's Literature". Klingel discussed how to recognize the types of children's literature, the myths about writing for children, and the writing process for Child Lit and how it differed for each kind of Child Lit. She also went over questions to ask your publisher before signing a contract and addressed how to market Child Lit.




Gary Carden
Gary Carden's topic was "Folk Drama", its origin at Chapel Hill, NC. and his exposure to folk drama at Western Carolina Teacher's College classes. He ended his presentation with a discussion of how his work defines the purpose of folk drama as exemplified by Paul Green and Fred Koch. 





Tom Davis
There was a Marketing and Publishing panel, at the end of the day at the conference. Participants were: Tom Davis, publisher (Old Mountain Press), Deanna Klingel, author, Tara Lynne Groth, marketing expert, and Glenda Beall, author and teacher.  The panel was moderated by Staci Lynn Bell, poet and former radio personality.




This event was planned by Glenda Council Beall, program coordinator for NCWN-West, with the help of several volunteers. The volunteers were: Marcia Barnes, Catherine Carter, Merry Elrick, Joan Howard, Kathleen Knapp, and Joan Ellen Gage. A special thanks goes out to Newton Smith, NCWN-West's treasurer for managing the business end of the conference.

Karen Paul Holmes, Deanna Klingel, and Janice Moore were influential with marketing this conference.



Jessica
We want to express our appreciation  to the Jackson County Library staff for all of their wonderful help in planning, setting up and tearing down.If we had need of anything, they were right there with it.

Thanks, Jessica!







Here are some photographs of the volunteers, our marketing team, and our treasurer:

Kathleen Knapp and Joan M. Howard

Glenda Council Beall and Marcia Barnes
Staci Lynn Bell (right) with Tara Lynne Groth
Merry Elrick
Catherine Carter  

Janice Townley Moore
Deanna Klingel
Karen Paul Holmes

Newton Smith

Photos by Joan Ellen Gage.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Writers' Night Out, Blairsville, 2017 Schedule

Here's the revised schedule of distinguished readers. There's always an open mic too. 
The View Grill is open for dinner or refreshment -- arrive by 6 p.m. to be served.  


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Students of Clay County, NC, receive awards for Poetry and Songwriting Lyrics April 25, 2017, co-sponsored by NCWN-West and the Clay Co. Historical and Arts Council


Winners of the Clay County Middle & High School Poetry & Songwriting Lyric Contest, 2017

 

On Tuesday, April 25, 2017, Hayesville Middle and High Schools received awards for their entries in the Poetry and Songwriting Lyric Contests. The Clay County Historical and Arts Council, and the North Carolina Writers’ Network-West gave awards. The Copper Door Restaurant, Brothers Willow Ranch Restaurant, Rib Country in Hayesville, Rib Country in Hiawassee, Mary’s Southern Grill, and Chevelle’s in Hayesville donated NCWN-West’s awards.

Reba Beck from the Clay County Historical and Arts Council and Joan Ellen Gage, from the North Carolina Writers' Network-West, initiated and co-sponsored the contest, which will become an annual event in Clay County Schools.


Rosemary Rhodes Royston
Winners of the Middle School Contest for Poetry were: 1st place, Brodi Carter, 2nd place, Annessca Guyette, and 3rd place Whitley Sumpter. There were no entries for Songwriting Lyrics for the Middle school.

Winners of the High School Contest for Poetry were: 1st place, Dawson Mitchell, 2nd place, Abigail Combs, and 3rd place Montana Walker. Honorable mention was awarded to Sage Cook, and Austin Hobbs.

Winners of the High School Contest for Songwriting Lyrics were: 1st place,

 Jade Welch, 2nd placeHaley Odom, and 3rd place Victoria Beck. Judges for the contests included author Rosemary Rhodes Royston, poet, author, and NCWN-West representative, and songwriters Rob Tiger, Wyatt Espalin, and Brian Kruger. Program Coordinator for NCWN-West, Glenda Council Beall, read in place of Rosemary Rhodes Royston, from the book, “Splitting the Soil”, by Royston.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Local Poet Mary Ricketson has poem published in Whispers in the Wind, an international online journal



Mary Ricketson
Mary Ricketson's poem, "Morsels", was published in Whispers in the Wind, an international online journal.  Here is the link to the poem:

http://whispersinthewind333.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2017-04-20T19:32:00-07:00&max-results=30

Whispers is an international blog by Karen O'Leary that emphasizes poets being in community with each other.  Comments are invited.  Submission is easy, see guidelines on their website. 

Mary Ricketson, Murphy NC, has been writing poetry 20 years.  She is inspired by nature and her work as a mental health counselor.  Her poetry has been published in Wild Goose Poetry Review, Future Cycle Press, Journal of Kentucky Studies, Lights in the Mountains, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge, Red Fox Run, It’s All Relative, Old Mountain Press, Whispers. Additionally, Ricketson has a chapbook I Hear the River Call my Name, and a full length collection of poetry, Hanging Dog Creek, published by Future Cycle Press. 

Currently Mary is using her own poetry to present empowerment workshops, combining roles as writer and her helping role as a therapist. Mary Ricketson’s poems and activities relate with nature, facilitate talk about a personal path and focus on growth in ordinary and unusual times.

Ricketson is the Cherokee County representative to North Carolina Writers Network-West, and president of Ridgeline Literary Alliance. She won first place in the 2011 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest 75th anniversary national poetry contest, and writes a monthly column, "Women to Women", for The Cherokee Scout.  

Ricketson is a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and an organic blueberry farmer.





Friday, April 28, 2017

Writers' Night May 12: Viva México and more...



"Diana's poems leap with the color and music of Mexico, where she spent most of her life."

A former resident of Mexico—Diana Anhalt’s parents moved there from New York in 1950 in order to escape possible persecution during the McCarthy era­—she now lives in Atlanta. 
 
Her poetry books are Because There is No Return (Passager), Second Skin (Future Cycle), and Lives of Straw (Finishing Line). Her work's been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in Nimrod,  The Comstock Review, Atlanta Review, and many other literary journals. She's also the author of the non-fiction book, A Gathering of Fugitives: American Political Expatriates in Mexico 1948-1965 (Archer Books), as well as essays and book reviews published in both English and Spanish. She says, "I'm waiting for my writing to acquire a southern accent." 

Friday, April 14, 2017

Poet Joan M. Howard publishes her first book, Death and Empathy: My Sister Web



Teacher and poet Joan M. Howard began keeping a diary of poems in 1995, when her beloved sister, Susan Webster McAllister Swap, passed away. The poems were focused not only on her grief but also on the incredible gift of life itself, as well as the beauty of the lives of both her sister and Howard’s late husband, Jack.

Howard uses formal and free verse poetry to create a tribute to the holy gift of existence, which shows itself in many wonderful forms: through nature, animals, travel, and love. Her themes are universal and capture the humility, strength, courage, and resilience that live inside all of us—and all of which were essential parts of both her sister’s and her husband’s lives. Their genuine love of life and their ability to empathize were what Howard most admired about them, and they serve as the lifeline through all her poetry.




Joan M. Howard lives near the beautiful waters of Lake Chatuge in Georgia. The serenity of her surroundings inspires much of her poetry. Her interests include kayaking, birding and boating.
Joan M. Howard's poetry has appeared in the Aurorean, Lucid Rhythms, The Road Not Taken:The Journal of Formal Poetry, The Deronda Review, Victorian Violet Press, Wild Goose Poetry Review, The Reach of Song 2012 poetry anthology (Georgia Poetry Society), POEM, Miller's Pond, Eclectic Muse,The Lyric and other journals.

Here is the link for: Death and Empathy: My Sister Web

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Author and prose writer Marcia Hawley Barnes and author and poet Janice Townley Moore to read at John C. Campbell Folk School's Literary hour, Thursday, April 20, 2017




On Thursday, April 20, 2017  at 7:00 PM, the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC, and NC Writers Network- West are sponsoring The Literary Hour, an hour of poetry and prose reading held at Keith House on the JCFS campus. This event is normally held the third Thursday of the month unless otherwise notified.  The reading is free of charge and open to the public. Poets and writers Janice Townley Moore and Marcia Hawley Barnes will be the featured readers. Both of these writers are widely published and their readings are always events that entertain.

Janice Townley Moore
Janice Townley Moore, Professor Emeritus of English at Young Harris College, published a chapbook, Teaching the Robins, with Finishing Line Press in 2005. Her poems have appeared in Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, Southern Poetry Review, Connecticut Review, Journal of the American Medical Association, and in many anthologies. Her latest poem was published in Coming Off the Line: The Car in American Culture, published by Main Street Rag. An active member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, she is coordinator for the poetry critique group which meets at Tri-County Community College.



Marcia Hawley Barnes

Marcia Hawley Barnes,is a Georgia writer and poet. She is a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, NetWest, and Ridgeline Literary Alliance. Ms. Barnes celebrated the American family and cuisine in 2008, when she researched, illustrated, and published The Little Book of Secret Family Recipes. A heritage cookbook, the collection contains favorite recipes found in the archives of her family. In 2016, her first children’s book, Tobijah, illustrated by Doreyl Ammons Cain, was published by Catch the Spirit of Appalachia.  The book was nominated for the Georgia Author of the Year Award in 2017. Her poetry has been published in Stone, River, Sky, An Anthology of Georgia Poems. The author also writes a monthly book review for a local newspaper, Clay County Progress