Showing posts with label poetry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label poetry. Show all posts

Monday, July 17, 2017

Poet Glenda Barrett to read at Coffee with the Poets & Writers on Wednesday, July 19, 2017, at the Moss Memorial Library, Hayesville, NC

This Wednesday, July 19, 2017, poet Glenda Barrett will read at Coffee with the Poets and Writers, at 10:30 AM, at the Moss Memorial Library, 26 Anderson Street, Hayesville, NC. This event is sponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network-West, and is open to the public. An open mic for all attendees will follow Barrett's reading.

 Glenda Barrett, a native of Hiawassee, Georgia, is an artist, poet, and writer. Her work has been

widely published yearly since her first writing class in 1997 and has appeared in: Woman's World, Farm & Ranch Living, Country Woman, Chicken Soup for the Soul, Journal of Kentucky Living, Nantahala Review, Rural Heritage, Wild Goose Poetry Review, Kaleidoscope Magazine and many more.

Barrett's poetry chapbook, When the Sap Rises, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2008. She has completed two more books since that time, a book of poetry with Kelsay Books, The Beauty of Silence,  available on Amazon, and a book of Appalachian essays. Glenda worked many years in various healthcare system jobs and retired due to a form of Muscular Dystrophy.

She is very grateful to be able to devote her time to the two things she loved as a child, painting and writing. She has two grown children and lives with her husband of forty-two years in the North Georgia mountains.

Barrett is a member of the North Carolina Writers' Network-West. For more information on this event, contact Glenda Council Beall, Program Coordinator of NCWN-West, at 828-389-4441.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Poet Maren O. Mitchell has poems in the July 2017 publication of The Lake, in Slant, Summer 2017, in POEM, May 2017, and Comstock Review Spring/Summer 2017


Maren O. Mitchell's poem, "Outside In," is currently in the July issue of The Lake, an online English poetry journal. Her poem, "A Is an Article to Anchor," appears in SLANT, A Journal of Poetry, Summer 2017, and poems, "K, Lost Dog" and "I Want to Remember" appeared in POEM, May 2017. Forthcoming in Comstock Review, Spring/Summer 2017 is the poem, "D, The First Syllable."

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Appalachian author Glenda Barrett publishes a new book, The Beauty of Silence, with Kelsay Books


Appalachian author Glenda Barrett has published a book of poetry with Kelsay Books. The Beauty of Silence, is available on amazon. Here is what writers Nancy Simpson, Mary Ricketson, and Janice Townley Moore say about Barrett's book:


In The Beauty of Silence, Glenda Barrett reveals the most authentic Appalachian voice to rise out of the southern mountains in years. “The Gist of the Matter,” invites us in, as she sits at a table with her kinfolks, peeling and eating an apple. The reader listens as this wise family elder recounts the then and now of her mountain heritage. In her poem, “Sorting it Out,” she affirms, “In hindsight, my best lessons were learned not in good times, but in deepest sorrow. I learned pain would not destroy me.” Her hope is to share specific truths. This nugget of wisdom emerges from, “Serenity,” “I’ve learned the comfort and peace found in solitude.” I chose, “The Fork of the River,” as my favorite. “My best lessons have been learned not in chaos, but in places of silence. Like the Cherokee before me, I seek direction in the quietness of the morning."

—Nancy Simpson, author of Across Water, Night Student, and Living Above the Frost Line, New and Selected Poems


Glenda Barrett’s poems reflect a wisdom that grows from a life-long relationship with nature. The gentle flow of a mountain stream, the hardship of ice in winter, and a sudden drought in summer contribute to her perspective. In The Beauty of Silence, Barrett plants seeds for the reader through a garden of strong people, simple ways, and the wisdom of experience. From her grandmother, her ancestors, flowers in a garden, to the trail tree of the Cherokee, she sifts her life to find nuggets of country wisdom. She “stands knee deep in the cool, clear waters of Owl Creek.” A quiet simplicity feeds her, feeds the reader. “Clods of dirt are busted, large rocks rolled aside, tangled vines uprooted, and brambles turned under,” until it’s time to return to my complicated life.” Barrett is a “homegrown girl” who couldn’t leave her roots for long. Her poems provide the reader a wealth of perspective, a wisdom long remembered.

—Mary Ricketson, M. E. Ed., Licensed Professional Counselor, author of I Hear the River Call My Name, and Hanging Dog Creek



In clearly crafted poems, Glenda Barrett connects a literal geography, the North Georgia mountains of her heritage, to a landscape of honest and varied emotions. There is elation in, “I can almost feel the pulse beat of my ancestors who hoed this ground,” balanced with sorrow, “I felt searing pain like deep furrows plowed slowly back and forth across my heart.” As a poet who finds meaning in the ordinary, she often surprises the reader with insights such as, “For the soil to be useful it has to be broken.” Always close to the natural world, her poems reveal that she is a professor of the five senses, as when she describes spring, “Even the red tulips . . . with their mouths wide open seem to be shouting with the rest of creation, 'Hallelujah.'" As seen her lines reflect a triumphant spirit that is certain to be transferred to readers.

—Janice Townley Moore, author of Teaching the Robins



 Glenda Barrett, a native of Hiawassee, Georgia, is an artist, poet, and writer. Her work has been
widely published yearly since her first writing class in 1997 and has appeared in: Woman's World, Farm & Ranch Living, Country Woman, Chicken Soup for the Soul, Journal of Kentucky Living, Nantahala Review, Rural Heritage, Wild Goose Poetry Review, Kaleidoscope Magazine and many more.

Barrett's poetry chapbook, When the Sap Rises, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2008. She has completed two more books since that time, a full-length poetry book which is currently under review by a publisher and a book of Appalachian essays. Glenda worked many years in various healthcare system jobs and retired due to a form of Muscular Dystrophy.

She is very grateful to be able to devote her time to the two things she loved as a child, painting and writing. She has two grown children and lives with her husband of forty-two years in the North Georgia mountains.

Barrett is a member of the North Carolina Writers' Network-West.



Friday, June 23, 2017

Interview with Rosemary Rhodes Royston on Writers Digest by Robert Brewer


Please access this interview with Rosemary Rhodes Royston on Writers Digest by Robert Brewer:

http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/rosemary-rhodes-royston-poet-interview

Rosemary is a long time member of NCWN and NCWN West and served as Program Coordinator a few years back. She holds an MFA in Writing from Spalding University and is a lecturer at Young Harris College, Georgia.


Royston’s poetry has been published in journals such as The Southern Poetry Review, The Comstock Review, Main Street
Rag, Coal Hill Review, FutureCycle, STILL, New Southerner, and Alehouse. She has a chapbook, Splitting the Soil, published by Finishing Line Press.
Her essays on writing poetry are included in Women and Poetry: Tips on Writing, Teaching and Publishing by Successful Women Poets, McFarland. Her poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and she was the recipient of the 2010 Literal Latte Food Verse Award. Most recently, she received Honorable Mention in the George Scarbrough Poetry Contest, Mountain Heritage Literary Festival, along with her short fiction being selected as Honorable Mention in the Porter Fleming Literary Awards, 2012. She blogs at The Luxury of Trees.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Coffee with the Poets and Writers features writers Staci Lynn Bell and Joan M. Howard on June 21, 2017, 10:30 AM, at the Moss Memorial Library, Hayesville, NC



Coffee with the Poets and Writers will meet June 21, 2017, 10:30 AM at Moss Memorial Library in Hayesville, NC. Staci Lynn Bell and Joan Howard will be featured members this month. 

Staci Lynn Bell, a Chicago native, has lived in Western North Carolina for the past 6 years. Having moved many times as a child, her best friends were her imagination, books and animals. Staci attended University of Wisconsin, Madison majoring in Communications. She relocated to SW Florida, gaining recognition as a 25 year radio and television personality and animal advocate.  She has been published in Wild Goose Poetry Review, 234 Journal, Old Mountain Press Anthologies and in Kakalak 2016. Bell has both a poem and short story in Wolf Warriors: The National Wolfwatcher Coalition Anthology. Staci is a member of the NCWN.


Joan M. Howard lives in Hiawassee and in Athens, Georgia. Joan loves to kayak on Lake Chatuge and take long walks on the Chatuge Dam. She holds a BA from Indiana University and an MA from the University of Oregon. Her poems have been widely published in journals and anthologies.  She published a poetry collection recently, Death and Empathy: My Sister Web, which is in memory of her sister, Webster and her husband Jack.

It has been said that, “Howard’s poetry will not only make you ache for something or someone lost; it will stitch together a broken heart.”

The public is invited to attend Coffee with the Poets and Writers. Everyone is invited to take part in Open Mic and read a poem or short piece of prose. 

This event is sponsored by the North Carolina Writers’ Network West, a program of the state literary organization, North Carolina Writers’ Network. 

Contact Glenda Beall, 828-389-4441 or glendabeall@msn.com for more information.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Poets Karen Paul Holmes and Brenda Kay Ledford to read at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC, on Thursday, June 15, 2017



JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL

On Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 7:00 PM, John Campbell Folk School and North Carolina Writers' Network-West are sponsoring The Literary Hour, an hour of poetry and prose reading held at Keith House on the JCFS campus. This event is held regularly on the third Thursday the month. The reading is free of charge and the public is invited to attend. Poets Karen Paul Holmes and Brenda Kay Ledford will be the featured readers, both of which are widely published poets. This should be an excellent program and presents an exceptional opportunity to hear these two women read their poems, many of which are centered on the mountain area.

Karen Paul Holmes was selected for Best Emerging Poets, 2015 (Stay Thirsty Media), and her full-length poetry collection, Untying the Knot,was published by Aldrich Press in 2014 (available on Amazon.com). Her poems have appeared in journals, such as Prairie Schooner, Poet Lore, Poetry East, and Atlanta Review, and anthologies such as The Southern Poetry Anthology, Vol 5: Georgia. Holmes serves as the Towns County Representative for the North Carolina Writers' Network-West, and is a member of the Georgia Poetry Society.

Formerly the VP-Communications at ING, Holmes now works as a freelance writer and teaches writing classes at John C. Campbell Folk School, Writers Circle, and elsewhere. She’s inspired by the Blue Ridge Mountains, Lake Chatuge, and her home in Hiawassee, GA. Holmes supports writers through a critique group she started in Atlanta, and the Writers Night Out she founded/hosts in Blairsville on the second Friday of every month.

Brenda Kay Ledford is a seventh-generational native of Clay County. She was an honor graduate of Hayesville High School, earned her Master of Arts in Education from Western Carolina University, and received a diploma of highest honors in creative writing from Stratford Career Institute.

Ledford’s work has appeared in many journals including Our State, Woman’s World, Country Extra, Chicken Soup for the Soul, Angels on Earth, 30 Old Mountain Press anthologies and Blue Ridge Parkway Silver Anniversary Edition coffee-table book.

Aldrich Press published her poetry book, Crepe Roses, that won the 2015 Paul Green Multimedia Award from North Carolina Society of Historians. Ledford has received this award nine times for her books, collecting oral history on Southern Appalachian and on her blogs: http://blueridgepoet.blogspot.com and http://historicalhayesville.blogspot.com.She also won the North Carolina Press Association’s Journalism Contest Award for her feature on the John C. Campbell Folk School in 1999.

Ledford is listed with A Directory of American Poets and Fiction Writers, North Carolina Literary Map, North Carolina Storytelling Guild, and Who’s Who in America. She has appeared on the “Common Cup,” talk show on Windstream Communication’s cable television, and also was interviewed on “The Blue Sky Show” over WJUL/WJRB Radio Station and gives regional poetry readings.

Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Writers' Workshop, Asheville, NC, offers Saturday Writing Workshops starting June 3, 2017


The Writers’ Workshop is offering classes and contests for beginning and experienced writers. Each class meets on Saturdays, 10-4 pm, at 387 Beaucatcher Rd., Asheville. Registration is in advance only, at www.twwoa.org. Classes are $75 each, or $70 for Workshop members. Financial assistance is available for low-income writers.

Schedule:

June 3: Writing the Novel with Karen Ackerson

The class will discuss key aspects of the novel – creating unforgettable characters, developing conflict, tension and honest dialogue, and describing a sense of place. Readings of award-winning literary novelists will serve as examples of fine writing Editing techniques will also be taught, including eliminating unnecessary details, building tension, and fine-tuning dialogue and descriptions. Participants may bring a synopsis and five pages to the class for review. Ackerson is Senior Editor at the Renbourne Editorial Agency, and has taught workshops throughout the Southeast for over 20 years.

June 10: How to Self-Publish and Promote Your Book with Peggy DeKay

Whether you are a published author or writing your first book, this class will give you a comprehensive guide to making money by self-publishing. The class will cover everything from creating a manuscript to selling your book on Amazon and in bookstores - the smart and profitable way. Tips will be given on how to use print-on-demand technology and CreateSpace to publish and sell your book. DeKay is the author of Self-Publishing for Virgins, and teaches seminars throughout the Southeast.

June 24: Exploring Your Options with Richard Krawiec

Often when a piece of writing isn't working, it's because we are trying to force the material into the wrong form. How can you tell if that work of flash fiction you're wrestling with should really be a memoir? Or the short story a novel? Maybe that poem should be a lyric essay, or that essay a poem? In this session we will generate material, then look at ways to identify what form is best suited for you, and what techniques to use for your particular piece. Krawiec has published three novels; a short story collection; and numerous books of poetry and plays. His work has appeared in Shenandoah, Sou-wester, and Ampersand among many other literary magazines, and was featured in Best American Short Stories.

July 15: Poetry and Tension with Eric Nelson

Conflict—or tension—is indispensable to successful poetry, providing the driving force of the poem as well as its depth and complexity. Writers of all levels will explore different kinds of poetic tension, from the most subtle, such as haiku, to the most obvious (such as epics) through reading and discussion of examples, and by creating tension in our own poems through prompts and exercises. Nelson’s six books include the award winning collections Some Wonder (Gival Press Poetry Award), Terrestrials (Texas Review Poetry Award), and The Interpretation of Waking Life (University of Arkansas Poetry Award). He has taught poetry workshops at Georgia Southern University for 26 years.

August 19: Writing Historical Fiction with Anne Barnhill

The class will learn vital aspects of writing historical fiction, including how to make historical figures 'come alive', how to use dialogue from another century, where to find research materials, and much more. We will be doing writing exercises geared to historical fiction, as well as taking a brief look at some historical novels to see how other writers work. Barnhill is the award-winning author of numerous books, including At the Mercy of the Queen; Coal Baby; Queen Elizabeth’s Daughter; and What You Long For. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from UNC-Wilmington, and teaches workshops throughout the state.


For more info, contact writersw@gmail.com or 828-254-8111.