Registration and Schedule for A Day for Writers

A Day for Writers - May 6, 2017 -
Jackson County Public Library, Sylva, NC

A one day writing conference for writers of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, children's literature, and anyone who wants to publish their writing.

Look on the sidebar of this post for Pages. Click on the page with the Schedule for a Day for Writers.

Look for the Registration Form on the sidebar under Pages. Copy and print this form. Complete and follow directions on the form.
Showing posts with label Writing Classes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Writing Classes. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Netwest Members offered discount on classes before deadline

Netwest members - take advantage of this opportunity to attend a workshop with well-published Atlanta author, Patricia Sprinkle.

Saturday, June 14 - Take individual classes, 10 - 1:00 and 2 - 5:00 p.m.,  or take both classes for $60. This writer speaks to large groups, teaches workshops and we are fortunate to have her come to our area. If you write fiction or nonfiction, you don't want to miss out on this one-time opportunity. We will have lunch together and you will have the opportunity to network with other writers and with Patricia.


Each class fee is $45 or both classes for $60.00 Netwest members - $40 for individual classes
Light lunch included for those who register for all day session 
 Deadline for registration: Thursday, June 11

Call 828-389-4441 or email glendabeall@msn.com 

Visit www.glendacouncilbeall.blogspot.com for class description.


Wednesday, January 29, 2014

What Should We do? Deanna Klingel, author, answers.

PictureWe have as guest writer today, Deanna Klingel, successful author of five books published by different publishers with three more to be released soon. Deanna lives in Sapphire Valley, NC with her husband and a rescued golden retriever. She is a member of NCWN West as well as other literary organizations. She admits she was a late starter in the world of publishing, but she hit the ground running and was a quick learner. Her advice is for all of us who write and want to write. Take note.


“So What’s it Like to be a Writer?” 

My signing table was inside the Low Country Museum in Yemassee, South Carolina. I’d had a lot of fun that Saturday talking to families and signing books for their middle graders. During a quiet few minutes a chubby boy wrapped in his puffy winter coat and toboggan hat paused and looked at my table. I guess he was eight, maybe nine.

“So, what’s it like to be a writer?” he asked. He caught me off guard and I didn’t have a quick reply. The usual question from precocious kids is “Do authors make a lot of money?” for which there is a quick answer.

“Well,” I thought aloud, “I spend a lot of time alone listening to voices talking in my head.”

“Yes!” he said. “That’s how it is for me, too. Whenever I get sent to my room alone, my head talks to me. When I get mad, it even talks more. And loud.”

“Hmm,” I said. “Maybe when you get mad you should write.”

“I guess you’re right,” he said. “That’s what I'll do. Next time I get sent to my room and I'm mad I'm going to write me a book. How many pages should it be?”

How many pages should it be? Whose voice should it be? What style should it be written in? What font should I use? New writers all worry about should. Should I send it to a publisher? Should I staple it? Should I get a Mac?

Even accomplished writers who participate on the online writers groups are often still asking should I? Should I change genre, should I use a pen name, should I have an agent, should I blog, should my main character turn out to be a bad guy? Should I use semi colons?

I’m not exactly an old timer in the publishing field.

I only started writing with a thought to publishing around 2005. My first book published in 2010. In the next few weeks book six, seven and eight will be released, all different publishers. That still makes me a relative newcomer. But I've had enough experience now that I can share some "what-I've-learned-along-the-way" suggestions.

The first thing I think you should do, is unload your shoulds. You can make yourself crazy with the angst of shoulds. There is no should. Your writing is a result of your writer voice. There can be no right or wrong to it. You should not should over it. Just write it.

Then there are things you must do. You must finish it. You must edit it. You must have another edit it. Then you must rewrite it. Then you must submit it. These aren't things you should do, these are things you must do. To submit you must do it exactly the way the publisher you’re submitting to instructs; not should, must.

Writing is easy for a writer. Writing for publication is not. It’s tedious, it’s lengthy, it’s lonely, it can get frustrating. There are so many things to learn, the more you learn the more you discover things you need to know!

You must go to conferences, workshops, take writing classes. You must. But you can make it easier on yourself if you relax and enjoy the entire process and not worry about all the shoulds. The voice in your head is yours and it must be heard. You should let it. You must. That's what it is to be a writer.

Deanna will be sharing her work at Coffee with the Poets and Writers at Blue Mountain Coffee and Grill on Wednesday, March 12, 10:30 a.m. This event is free and open to the public. 

Saturday, January 16, 2010

Leave a Written Legacy, Write Your Family Stories will be taught by Glenda Beall


This writing class is for you if you have wanted to write about your family but have not had the time to do it. This class is for you if you have a story to tell but have not known how to begin.
Maybe you have already started, but your writing folder is full of unorganized papers.

Give yourself a week to focus only on writing. Leave your chores behind. Spend a week studying with Glenda Beall at John C. Campbell Folk School. Glenda Beall will give you direction. Class begins on Sunday, February 21 and ends on Friday evening February 27, 2010.

CLASS DESCRIPTION:

Recover old memories using family photos and keepsakes. Write stories and personal essays about your unique life experiences for your children and grandchildren, and then fine-tune your work by sharing with classmates in a safe, comfortable atmosphere. Beginners to intermediate writers--join us to get your start or for motivation and ideas to organize your work.


Or call 1-800 FOLK SCH, (828) 837-2775 Local Residents may get half price.
Ask when you call.

Saturday, September 20, 2008

Nancy Purcell will teach Brevard College's Creekside creative writing program

Nancy Purcell, Netwest Transylvania County Representative, will be teaching a creative writing program for Brevard College's Creekside community education series. The program, "ABC's of Creative Writing," will begin Oct. 16 and continue every Thursday evening, from 6:30-8:30pm in the college's McLarty Building. Fee- $60.
Learn the ABC's of creative writing in an interactive setting. Designed for beginners and intermediate writers, these comprehensive basics will develop your writing skills through class exercise and craft interpretation. One-on-one critiques will be offered. Maximum enrollment: 8

For registration contact: Carol Persek, Coordinator of Community Education, Brevard College. Phone (828) 884-8251 or email: persekca@brevard.edu

Sunday, March 16, 2008

NEW WRITING STUDIO. COME WRITE

NEW WRITING STUDIO AT
JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL
--Nancy Simpson

The new writing studio is located on the grounds
at Orchard House, John C. Campbell Folk School (JCCFS)in Brasstown, North Carolina. The school itself is 83 years
old, world famous for devotion to arts and crafts The writing program only 13 years old, but the writing studio is brand spanking new.

Recently, I had an opportunity to teach the first class in the new studio, with state of the art computers, printer,copier, and all a writer would need including paper, paper.

My feet hardly touched ground all week as I watched my students working. Each had a writing space with their own computer and printer set up. We had an oval table to use for critiquing sessions, and we had the living room of Orchard House to sprawl out and relax in for teaching sessions and class discussions.

I’ve been teaching writing at the folk school for years,but I have never before seen such a large amount of writing started and finished in one week. The school itself, with sparks of creative energy popping, is a magical place to begin with. The new studio is a welcoming and conducive place for writers.

I invite you to come write with us for a week. If you have already taken writing classes at the folk school,come back as soon as you can. You may walk on air as
I have been doing. You will write, I promise.

If you have never been to the folk school, give it serious thought. Get a catalog, read the class descriptions,make your choice. Scholarships are available based on
financial need . The school offers half price to those living in specific mountain counties. Call the toll free number,check out the web site or e mail me with your questions at nance@dnet.net. Phone. 1800 FOLK-SCH.




John C. Campbell Folk School
Six SUMMER WRITING CLASSES:

May 25-30, 2008 - Spinning Words Into Gold with
Maureen Ryan Griffin. This class will jump start
your writing and and will provide tools to keepyour words flowing. Tap into the Who, Why, When, Where,What and How of Writing. All levels welcome.


June 22- 28, 2008 TOOLS OF THE TRADE, PROFESSIONAL WRITING
with Wendy Webb. The focus is on the short story, novel,and play writing.

June 29-July 5, 2008 FICTION, SHORT AND LONG with Bobbie Pell. Explore the nuggets of your experience that are universal and pop them into your fiction. All levels are welcome.

July 6-11, 2008 WRITING LIFE STORIES with Vickie Hunt.Make headway in creating a short story, personal essay or a memoir essay. All levels are welcome.

July 13-19, 2008 TO BE CONTINUED with Ruth Zehfuss. Focus on getting started
and learning techniques to keep you writing.

July 27-August 1, 2008 YOUR POETRY. LET’S HEAR IT,with Nancy Simpson. Learn to make your poetry sing with sound. Learn how to encapsulate emotion in your poems.
Class is for practicing free verse poets. How and where to publish will be discussed and a list of markets will be given.

See catalog for complete class listing and class descriptions