Showing posts with label Mary Ricketson. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mary Ricketson. Show all posts

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Readings from CWTPW on September 21, 2016, with Staci Lynn Bell and Mary Ricketson


 Did you miss Staci Lynn Bell and Mary Ricketson  reading  their poetry at

CWTPW, on September 21, 2016, at the Moss Memorial Library, Hayesville, NC? Please find excerpts 

from their reading here:


Saturday, September 17, 2016

Poets Staci Lynn Bell and Mary Ricketson to read at CWTPW, Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at the Moss Memorial Library, Hayesville, NC

Join us for Coffee With the Poets and Writers, Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at 10:30 AM, at the Moss Memorial Library, 26 Anderson St., Hayesville, NC. This month, we are featuring poets Staci Lynn Bell, and Mary Ricketson. This event is open to the public, and an open mic will follow the readings.

Staci Lynn Bell is a Chicago native who attended the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She relocated to South Florida, gaining popularity as a 25 year radio and television personality. Bell’s poetry and prose have also been published in Wild Goose Poetry, Wolf Warriors Anthology,and 234 Journal. She lives with the loves of her life, her two dogs, in Hayesville, NC.

Bell's poem, "Escape" has been published in Old Mountain Press Anthology, Wish You Were Here. Her poem, "Unanswered Prayers" has been accepted for publication in the fall edition of Kakalak 2016. Additionally, Bell's poem, "Time," won a bronze medal and her short story, "Cheyenne" won a silver medal in the North Carolina Cherokee and Clay County's Silver Arts 2016.

Mary Ricketson of Murphy NC, has been writing poetry for 20 years; to satisfy a hunger, to taste life down to the very last drop. She is inspired by nature and her work as a mental health counselor. Her poetry has been published in Wild Goose Poetry Review, Future Cycle Press, Journal of Kentucky Studies, Lights in the Mountains, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge, Freeing Jonah, and her chapbook I Hear the River Call my Name. Mary's second poetry book is Hanging Dog Creek
 
Mary is the Cherokee County Representative for the North Carolina Writers Network-West, and is the president of Ridgeline Literary Alliance.

She won the gold medal for poetry in the 2011 Cherokee County Senior Games/Silver Arts and silver medal for 2012 and 2013, and first place in the 2011 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest 75th anniversary national poetry contest.

Ricketson writes a monthly column, "Women to Women", for The Cherokee Scout, Murphy's newspaper. She is a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor, an organic blueberry farmer, and is currently working on a new collection of poetry.
 
This event is sponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network-West. For more information, please call Glenda Council Beall at 828-389-3733.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Glenda Council Beall and Mary Ricketson to read at The Literary Hour at John C. Campbell Folk School, Brasstown, NC, Thursday, September 22, 2016, 7:00 PM



Glenda Council Beall
Mary Ricketson
JOHN CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL

On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 7:00 PM, John C.Campbell Folk School and NC Writers Network West are sponsoring The Literary Hour, an hour of poetry and prose reading held at Keith House on the JCFS campus. Usually this is held on the third Thursday of the month but this month it will be the fourth Thursday. The reading is free of charge and open to the public. Poets Mary Ricketson and Glenda C. Beall will be the featured readers; both are well-established mountain area poets.

Glenda Council Beall is a poet, memoirist, and teacher. Beall’s poems, essays and short stories have been published in numerous literary journals and magazines including, Reunions Magazine, Main Street Rag Poetry Journal, Appalachian Heritage, Journal of Kentucky Studies and online, Your Daily Poem, Muscadine Lines: A Southern Journal, The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, and Wild Goose Poetry Review.

Beall's poems have been anthologized in The Southern Poetry Anthology: Volume VII: North Carolina 2014, Lights in the Mountains, The Best of Poetry Hickory Series, 2011, Kakalak: North Carolina Poets of 2009, and Women’s Spaces, Women’s Places, among others. Her poems have won awards in the James Still Poetry Contest and the Clay County NC Poetry Contest.

Beall taught memoir writing at John C. Campbell Folk School for a number of years. She teaches senior adults to write about their lives at Tri-County Community College where she will begin a new course on September 1. She says she enjoys hearing the unique stories written by each of her students. “Everyone can leave a written legacy for their grandchildren,” says Glenda.


Glenda served as leader of North Carolina Writers’ Network West in 2007 and 2008, and is now Clay County Representative for NCWN West. She is a co-administrator of the blog for NCWN-West.

Beall is author of NOW MIGHT AS WELL BE THEN, poetry published by Finishing Line Press, and she compiled a family history, PROFILES AND PEDIGREES, THOMAS CHARLES COUNCIL AND HIS DESCENDANTS, published by Genealogy Publishing Company.

Glenda Beall is owner/director of Writers Circle Around the Table, where she invites those interested in writing poetry or prose to her home studio for classes taught by some of the best poets and writers in North Carolina and Georgia. Links are: www.glendacouncilbeall.com and www.profilesandpedigrees.blogspot.com

Mary Ricketson, Murphy NC, has been writing poetry 20 years, to satisfy a hunger, to taste life down to the very last drop. She is inspired by nature and her work as a mental health counselor. Her poetry has been published in Wild Goose Poetry Review, Future Cycle Press, Journal of Kentucky Studies, Kentucky Review, Lights in the Mountains, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge, Freeing Jonah, Red Fox Run, and her chapbook, I Hear the River Call my Name. Her new collection of poetry, Hanging Dog Creek, was recently published by Future Cycle Press. She is Cherokee County representative to North Carolina Writers Network West, and president of Ridgeline Literary Alliance.

Mary writes a monthly column, Women to Women, for The Cherokee Scout. She is a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor and an organic blueberry farmer.
Ricketson won the gold medal for poetry in the 2011 Cherokee County Senior Games/Silver Arts and silver medal for 2012 and 2013, and first place in the 2011 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest 75th anniversary national poetry contest.

The Literary Hour is co-sponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network-West. which is a program of NC Writers Network.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Photos from NCWN-West's booth at the Festival on the Square, Hayesville, NC, July 2016

North Carolina Writers' Network West's booth at the Festival on the Square, Hayesville, North Carolina hosted poet and writer attendees including: Tom and Polly Davis, Glenda Council Beall, Mary Ricketson, Rosemary Royston, Marcia Hawley Barnes, Joan M. Howard, Lucy Cole Gratton, Janice Townley Moore, Staci Lynn Bell,Bob Grove, and Joan Ellen Gage. Below are some photos of the event.

Rosemary Royston

Glenda Council Beall

Bob Grove and Lucy Cole Gratton

Glenda Council Beall, Bob Grove, Lucy Cole Gratton, Janice Townley Moore, and Lucy Rozier. Hidden is Joan M. Howard


Tom Davis and Janice Townley Moore
Marcia Hawley Barnes

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Curiosity Shop Bookstore, Murphy, NC, to host book signing Sat. 11/28/15, 11 AM to 3 PM for: It’s All Relative: Tales from the Tree, from 50 WNC Women Writers

Celia H. Miles and Nancy Dillingham, are co-editors and contributors of a new anthology by 50 women writers from western North Carolina, entitled: It’s All Relative: Tales from the Tree – celebrating the lives of women and their connections with their families.

Celia Miles, a native of Appalachia, was a long-time English instructor at Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College. She is retired and living in Asheville, does freelance editing and writing in various genres.

Nancy Dillingham is a writer, educator and a sixth-generation native from Big Ivy in Western North Carolina. She currently lives in Asheville, NC.

Local authors who contributed to It's all Relative, are from Clay County, Glenda Council Beall, M.C. Brooks, and Blanche L.Ledford. Cherokee County authors who contributed are, Lucy Cole Gratton, Mary Rickertson, and Peg Russell.


The Curiosity Shop Bookstore in Murphy, NC will host the book signing this Saturday, 11/28/2015, from 11 AM to 3 PM. Please come out and show your support for these local authors!

Glenda Council Beall, a Georgia native, lives in Hayesville, NC, and is the owner and director of 'Writers Circle Around the Table', a studio for writers. She also teaches writing in the continuing education department at Tri-County Community College in Murphy, NC. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals and in anthologies. Beall has also published short stories and personal essays.
She has a poetry chapbook, entitled: Now Might as Well be Thenand a family history book Profiles and Pedigrees.
 
M.C. Brooks was a student in one of Glenda Council Beall's memoir writing class at Tri-County Community College in Murphy, NC.

Blanche L.Ledford is a native Appalachian poet, who co-authored the book Simplicity with her daughter Brenda Kay Ledford. Her work has been in many Old Mountain Press Anthologies, and the NCWN-West anthology, Echos Across the Blue Ridge. She also wrote the book, Planting by the Signs, which won the Paul Green Multi-media award from the NC Society of Historians, in 2012.

Lucy Cole Gratton, a native of Decatur, Georgia, has been writing for herself for many years, only lately seeking to publish with some success both nationally and internationally. She has been published in the Wild Goose Poetry Review, is the editor of the book, Red Fox Run,
and has a chapbook published entitled, Inagehi.
 
Mary Ricketson has had her poetry published in many journals, has a chapbook called, I Hear the River Call my Name, and is the author of Hanging Dog Creek. She is also published in the NCWN-West anthology, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge and in the book, Red Fox Run. She also has a chapbook, I Hear the River Call My Name. Mary is the Cherokee County Representative for the North Carolina Writers Network-West and is the president of Ridgeline Literary Alliance.

Peg Russell is a poet and writer. She is the former Prose leader for the NCWN-West Prose Workshop and is published in the NCWN-West anthology, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge. Russell also writes short essays.

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Mary Ricketson, poet, reads at Coffee with the Poet March 19 in Sylva

Coffee with the Poet at City Lights Books Features Mary Ricketson

The Coffee with the poet series continues on Thursday, March 19th at 10:30 a.m at City Lights Books in Sylva, NC
The March gathering will feature Cherokee County resident, Mary Ricketson.  She will read selections of poetry from her first full-length collection Hanging Dog Creek.  

Her poems include topics about fear, hardship, courage and the joys in everyday life.  Ricketson has been writing for over 20 years.  Her work is inspired by nature and her profession as a mental health counselor. She won the gold medal for poetry in the 2011 Cherokee County Senior Games/Silver Arts and silver medal for 2012 and 2013, and first place in the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest 75th anniversary national poetry contest. 

The Coffee with the Poet series meets the third Thursday of every month and is cosponsored by the North Carolina Writers' Network--West, the mountain chapter of the North Carolina Writers' Network. 

For more information on the Coffee with the Poet please call City Lights Bookstore at 828-586-9499.

City Lights Books
3 E Jackson St.
Sylva, NC 28779

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Mary Ricketson's March 'Woman to Woman' Column

Cherokee County NCWN/NetWest Representative Mary Ricketson writes a monthly column for the local newspaper, the Cherokee Scout. She has graciously shared her March column with us:
"March is women’s history month.  We are amazing people.  I am inspired by literally every woman I meet.  Every one of us has something to offer the world in some dimension.  All of us are unique, no one like us in the whole universe.  But unless we are famous, our stories get lost in the shuffle. 
One way to inspire girls and women is to tell stories of accomplished women.  Famous women like the pilot Amelia Earhart and astronaut Sally Ride inspire all of us.  We should keep telling the stories of famous women and their accomplishments.  But we should tell our local stories too.  Women in our families and those next door, and in the next county leave footprints every day for the rest of us to follow.  Each of us leaves footprints.  We are known for our courage, self-sacrifice, accomplishments and sometimes for our cooking.  We are known for our brains, our smile, our guts, and our stubbornness.
I remember a story of my mother.  I was a little girl, and my sister was a toddler.  We were walking in the park on a sunny afternoon, and there was a duck pond.  This duck pond was very special and inviting, and the sun shined on the deepest spot.  Somehow my mother got distracted, looked away, and did not see my sister walk into the pond.  She wanted to pet the ducks.  Now, my sister didn’t know how to swim but my mother did not either.  Quickly my mother turned around to see her youngest daughter sinking in the water.  Mother, armed only with adrenaline, rushed right in that pond, grabbed her precious child, and got back to shore before either of them drowned.  My sister does not walk into duck ponds anymore, but she does walk daily into difficult projects with single minded determination.  And she learned how to swim.
This story gets told over and over, for the memory, for the laughs, for the courage, and for any other reason that comes to mind.  Most of our stories are not pilots, astronauts, politicians, or anyone famous.  Our stories are about women in our lives, salt of the earth women, women who keep life going anyway we can.
Let’s tell the history of women, our women, and keep ourselves inspired.  Let’s tell our stories to girls and also to boys.  Let’s tell stories of women with a spirit of respect and admiration.  We are not courageous all the time, and we are not perfect.  We are ordinary women, and special and wonderful and unique, every one of us.  Keep our stories alive."
Thank you, Mary. We also hope that women everywhere will be inspired.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Woman to Woman, by Mary Ricketson

Mary Ricketson, the Cherokee county Netwest Representative, writes a column for the Cherokee Scout newspaper entitled Woman to Woman. Copied below are the contents of her column for the issue of September 25, 2013, important because of its emphasis on helping girls develop their self esteem. Thank you, Mary!

"Last month, on August 26, we celebrated women’s equality day.  We are well versed by now about the gains women have made in the past century, starting with the right to vote, on down to women in leadership and our growth toward equal pay.  Women’s opportunities today are better, even though we have not made it to full equality.

Still, girls’ self esteem and girls’ academic achievement tend to drop during the teen years, starting in middle school.

Low self esteem means someone thinks she is less than her peers, maybe unworthy, un-loveable, even incompetent.  It does not mean it is true, it just feels true.  Eventually this low self esteem type thinking can lead to self defeating behavior.

Teenage girls are very aware of their looks and about what males think of them.  Teen girls who have a poor self concept are more likely than others to engage in behaviors with boys that they will later regret.  They sell themselves short in expectations for education and employment.

Perception is not always accurate.  For instance, 7 out of 10 girls are said to believe they are not as good as their peers.  This is all about how they feel about their appearance, their grades, and their relationships with anybody.  A girl’s self esteem relates less to her actual body weight and more to how she perceives her body.

So, for all the opportunities in today’s life, why do so many girls lag behind? Sometimes it is fear of success.  Other times it is the age-old fear of being smarter than boys.  Always, in our society there is great pressure for girls to look good.  We are surrounded by pictures of good looks that are impossible to achieve.

Girls are great.  Girls are wonderful.  In all shapes and sizes, talents, interests and achievements, girls are individuals with something unique to offer.  Girls who take physical risks are more confident individuals, even if not athletic.  Girls who engage in cooperative activities gain self esteem.  Girls who receive recognition for accomplishments grow self respect.

To counteract the downward spiral of self esteem, let’s help a girl have specific positive experiences.  Help her find an activity she loves, something she can pursue with all her brains and guts.  Let her make choices and decisions for herself whenever possible.  Encourage her to solve issues independently. Allow her to express her own opinions, even disagree.  Respect her.  Let her know you like or love her because of who she is, not simply for how she looks.

Find more at dosomething.org, pbs parents, and dove.us, girls unstoppable.

Credits: Mary Ricketson makes her home in Cherokee county. She is a licensed professional counselor in private practice in Murphy. She has a special interest in women’s issues."

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Mary Ricketson and Nadine Justice to read at JCCFS Thursday night


JOHN C. CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL

              At 7:00 p.m. Thursday, February 21, 2013,  John C. Campbell Folk School  and  NC Writers Network West sponsor the monthly reading in the Keith House by members of NCWN. The reading is free of charge and open to the public.  Poets Mary Ricketson and writer, Nadine Justice will be the featured readers.  

Mary Ricketson’s poetry has been published in her chapbook, I Hear the River Call My Name, Lights in the MountainsFreeing Jonah IV, Freeing Johah V, Wild Goose Poetry ReviewFuture Cycle Press,Your Daily Poem, Journal of Kentucky Studies, various magazines and in Disorgananza, a private collection distributed among family and friends.  She won the gold medal for poetry in the 2011 Cherokee County Senior Games/Silver Arts.  She won first place in the 2011 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest national poetry contest.
Mary writes a monthly column, Woman to Woman, for The Cherokee Scout.  She is a member of the North Carolina Writers Network, a mental health counselor, and a farmer.

Mary says she writes to satisfy a hunger, to taste life all the way down to the last drop.  She gains perspective from family and friends, her Appalachian home, and her life’s work as a counselor.

Writing poetry places her in kinship with her own life.
Mary Ricketson is a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Murphy, North Carolina.  She brings more than thirty years experience to her work, with twenty-five years in private practice.  She is a founding board member of  REACH.  She has a special interest in women’s issues, victims of abuse, and family and couple relationships.  She offers innovative ways to effect change in difficult life patterns, including Journey to Intuition and Neurofeedback.  She is listed in Who’s Who in American Women.


Nadine Justice


Nadine Justice divides her time between a mountain-top cottage in north Georgia and her home in Atlanta. For the past few years she has worked on a memoir which was published last year. Excerpts have been published in an anthology by the Georgia Mountain Writers Club. She also enjoys a successful career as an interior designer. Her design work has been featured twice in Better Homes and Gardens and in Atlanta Custom Home magazines.

Nadine grew up in West Virginia and is the daughter of a coal miner. She is married to a retired federal agent, and enjoys spending time with her four “perfect” grandchildren.

Nadine is a new member of the North Carolina Writers' Network. She will share portions of her book, I'm a coal Miner's Daughter, But I Cain't Sang, at the reading on Thursday night. 

Friday, June 8, 2012

Mary Ricketson on the Program to Read at CWP June 13


Coffee with the Poets will have two Netwest featured readers this month, June 13, 10:30 a.m. Mary Ricketson is also on the program Wednesday with Maren Mitchell.

Mary Ricketson’s poetry has been published in her chapbook, I Hear the River Call My Name, Lights in the Mountains, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge, Freeing Jonah IV, Freeing Johah V, and Wild Goose Poetry Review, Future Cycle Press, Your Daily Poem, various magazines and blogs, and in Disorgananza, a private collection distributed among family and friends. She won the gold medal for poetry in the 2011 Cherokee County Senior Games/Silver Arts and silver medal for 2012. She won first place in the 2011 Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest national poetry contest.

Mary writes a monthly column, Woman to Woman, for The Cherokee Scout. She is a long time member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. Mary says she writes to satisfy a hunger, to taste life all the way down to the last drop. She gains perspective from family and friends, her Appalachian home, and her life’s work as a counselor. Writing poetry places her in kinship with her own life.

Mary Ricketson is a Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Murphy, North Carolina. She brings more than thirty years experience to her work, with twenty-five years in private practice. She is a founding board member of REACH. She has a special interest in women’s issues, victims of abuse, and family and couple relationships. She offers innovative ways to effect change in difficult life patterns, including Journey to Intuition and Neurofeedback. She is listed in Who’s Who in America.

Come out to hear Mary and Maren share their delightful poetry at Coffee with the Poets on Wednesday, June 13.



Thursday, March 15, 2012

Robert S. King, poet and editor, at Coffee with the Poets

Robert S. King                                                                                Nancy Simpson




         Nancy and Mary listen to Robert read.

Mary Ricketson from Murphy, NC will read her poetry at the book launch for the anthology, Future Cycle Flash Fiction - Poetry 2011, March 23 at City Lights Books in Sylva, NC. A number of Netwest members are listed in the table of contents for the book. Glenda Beall and Carole Thompson are also on the program to read at City Lights.



Brenda Kay Ledford 
will be the featured reader in April.


We appreciate Liz, owner of Cafe Touche. Besides the delicious sweets, she is now offering lunch. We can continue our socializing right there after the readings. Today the menu was baked ziti and a salad bar.




Sunday, May 24, 2009

Candy Maier Scholarship Fund

Mary Ricketson, Netwest Rep for Cherokee County, Mary Jo Dyre, Netwest Representative on the Board for NCWN Board of Trustees, Glenda Beall, Program Coordinator for Netwest, Gwendie Camp, Chairman of the Candy Fund, Cheryl Dietrich, treasurer of the Candy Fund stand in front of a beautiful quilt at the Curiosity Shop Bookstore in Murphy. The quilt was raffled off and a name drawn the day of our visit.

Recently Gwendie Camp and Cheryl Dietrich drove down to join Mary Jo Dyre who acts as a liaison for the Candy Fund, and her guests, Mary Ricketson and Glenda Beall to discuss the future of the new non-profit charity over lunch at Shoebooties' restaurant in Murphy. In the three years this fund has been active, they have raised $11,000 and given out 50 scholarships totaling $8, 000.
They are ready now to develop a website, send out a newsletter and hold a series of fundraisers. Gwendie says they have volunteer positions available on the Board of Directors and for regional coordinators to reach out beyond the boundaries of Asheville to women south and north of Buncombe county.

We offered our support from Netwest because we believe this to be a needed organization. The Candy Maier Fund provided scholarships to several of our members in the past couple of years. The Fund is seeking donations to help meet the growing need for Candy Fund scholarships. Donations, any amount is appreciated, are tax-exempt.The Candy Fund is the only scholarship program of its type in this area.
You can reach the Candy Maier Scholarship Fund for Women Writers by email: thecandyfund@yahoo.com or by snail mail: 4B Long shoals Road #164, Arden, North Carolina, 28704-7781.